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NOAA's Undersea Research Center for the Southeastern U.S. & Gulf of Mexico, University of North Carolina - Wilmington, Center for Marine Science, 5600 Marvin K. Moss Lane, Wilmington, NC 28409, Phone: (910) 962-2440 / Fax: (910) 962-2444 / Email: lindbertj@uncw.edu / Website: www.uncwil.edu/nurc/
Aquarius DiversNOAA's Undersea Research Center for the Southeastern United States and Gulf of Mexico (SEGM) conducts undersea research in the South Atlantic Bight (NC to FL), Florida Keys, and Gulf of Mexico. The southeast region is generally characterized by wide continental shelf and 60 percent of the nation's wetlands and estuarine drainage area. The operations program includes both in-house and leased capabilities. Undersea systems operated by the center include mixed gas scuba, remotely operated vehicles, the Aquarius undersea research laboratory, and support boats (6 to 15 m length) for nearshore work. Research submersibles and larger support ships are leased. Center facilities are located in Wilmington and Key Largo, FL, near the site of Aquarius. Center research goals evolve to meet changing national and regional needs. Science initiatives addressed by the center include research related to hydrocarbon exploration and development; management of fisheries resources; conservation of the Florida Keys' coral reefs; anthropogenic and natural processes that impact coastal resources (e.g., beach erosion) and introduction of excess nutrients to nearshore habitats; detection of present global climate conditions through long-term monitoring and assessment of past changes through geological and paleoceanographic studies.
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NOAA's Undersea Research Program
1315 East-West Highway, R/NURP - Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (301) 713-2427   Fax: (301) 713-1967  
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Updated: July 30, 2004